Timber by EMSIEN-3 LTD

Lendrums Driving School Blog

Welcome to the Lendrums Driving School Blog

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Team Blogs
    Team Blogs Find your favorite team blogs here.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in driving facts
Posted by on in Uncategorized

 

 

 

You’ll Never Forget Your First Car - So Choose it Wisely

If you’ve just joined the 800,000 or so people who pass their driving test in the UK every year, then congratulations! You will be relishing the sense of freedom and independence that it gives, and will doubtless be impatient to get your very first set of wheels.

Anybody’s first car is a big deal, and whether it is brand new out of the showroom or it has already seen a great deal of life and bears the scars to prove it, one thing is for sure - it is a car that you will never forget!

Preparing for the road ahead

Passing your test is just the first step on the way to becoming a safe and accomplished driver, so before you sever your ties with the driving school, it’s worth having a chat with your driving instructor about the choice of vehicles on the market, and maybe even having some advanced tuition to really get the feel of your new wheels. First, however, you need to get those keys in your hand - so what are the factors you need to consider when choosing your car?

Work out your budget

It sounds boring, but we are all subject to budgetary constraints. You can get a good car for £800 and you can get a good car for £8,000. But until you know exactly what your budget is, it’s pointless to even start looking.

Of course, purchase price is only the first part of the cost. You’ve also got to factor in road tax, maintenance and that subject that is most feared by new drivers, insurance cost.

How to minimise insurance cost

Don’t underestimate how much insurance can come to. A teenager could go out and buy that £800 car, only to find the insurance will cost them another £2,000 or more. However, there are ways to keep the cost down. Taking that advanced driving course will show insurers you are serious, and they will see you as a lower risk and adjust your premium accordingly. You could also look into companies that provide reduced rates for young drivers who agree to having a black box in their car, or to follow a “curfew” whereby they will not drive during certain hours, typically in the middle of the night.

Choose a car that will keep on teaching you

As a new driver, you will still be learning every day. Choose a car that will help you do just that. Don’t go for something with power-everything and lots of driver aids. Simple doesn’t have to mean boring, however. One of the best learning experiences you can have is by driving an older car, and many new drivers choose a popular classic such as a VW Beetle, Morris Minor or classic Mini.

One thing is for sure, you will stand out from your friends, and you will definitely have a first car you will never forget. Drive safely out there.

 

           Kindly written and supplied by JENNIFER DAWSON.

 

 

 How to Feel Safer on the Road and Protect Yourself from Aggressive Driver

Kindly written and supplied by Lisa, a freelance writer and enjoys writing about subjects such as road safety, women in sport and travel, and when isn’t writing can be found relaxing with a good book.
 
 

It’s an obvious fact that driving is one of the most stressful activities. Even the best drivers have found themselves cursing under their breath or yelling at one another when running late for work, stuck in a bad traffic, or just having a bad day. While feeling irritated and stressed is quite normal, a problem may arise when these feelings escalate into aggressive driving or road rage.

According to a recent study, aggressive driving contributes to over 66% of road fatalities every year. More so, 50% of drivers usually respond to aggressive driving in kind. So how can you feel safe on the road and protect yourself from aggressive drivers? Here are some of the ways.

1. Remain calm
Even if the other driver is behaving aggressively or angrily, it’s very important to remain courteous and calm. If another driver behaves aggressively by tailgating or cutting you off, your reaction to his behavior will definitely determine what takes place next. You need to try as much as possible to avoid any conflict. If he tries to engage you in an argument just ignore and drive off.

2. Reduce your stress and don’t take it personally
When driving along the highway you need to listen to soothing music. Make sure you are sitting in a good position and you are comfortable. Most importantly, you need to understand that the traffic is beyond your control hence you can only react to it. In the end,
you may realize that anger, personal frustration, and impatience are some of the worst things while driving.

3. Avoid making eye contact or using inflammatory gestures
Even if you don’t intend to challenge them, an eye contact can be perceived differently. Since many aggressive drivers are often driven by frustrations and personal insecurities, they can easily be angered by something as simple as an eye contact. Although it can be tempting to honk or make inflammatory gestures, doing so can inflame the other driver. Instead of releasing your anger and frustration this way, wait until you are through before sharing your situation with a friend or a family member.

4. Be a courteous driver
As a driver, there are some examples that you set that can really encourage other drivers. It’s, therefore, very important to control yourself and behave responsibly. Even most
car insurance groups encourage drivers to be courteous.

5. Talk to others
The best way to relieve yourself is to share recent road rage with your friends and family members or even community members. By doing this, you will better understand the situation and know how to protect yourself in future.

6. Report aggressive drivers
There are some countries and states that have contacts that you can use to report drivers. You just need to keep the number of the vehicle. Next, make a call and give out a full description of the vehicle. This could help you prevent any future strategy.

Although you may not have the capacity to avoid all aggressive driving situations, if you keep your head up and master these tips, you will have the best chance of greatly reducing any possible encounters. By doing this, you will also set the best example for young drivers who are always looking up to you. Remember, car insurance groups rarely compensate any accident caused by careless driving.

Key Things to Remember Legally When Involved in a Car Accident

Disclaimer: The information presented below serves only as a general guide on what you should do when involved in a car accident and mustn’t replace more reliable legal advice. To know more about what legal action you can take in the event that a car accident might happen to you, seeking the services of a licensed attorney is highly recommended.

As much as you might be exercising caution when you’re driving to the point that it comes second nature to you, not all drivers have the same defensive driving mindset as you do. So there’s no telling when you’ll come across another driver who’s less cautious than you are and can collide with your vehicle anytime. Therefore, you would want to read on and start noting some of the key things for you to remember legally in case a car accident happens to you.

What Are Some of the Key Things to Remember When Involved in a Car Accident?

The first reaction that you might have after another crashed into yours is one of shock that can linger for a long time depending on the severity of the car accident itself. However, you’d want to calm yourself down instead and take some comfort in the fact that you can do the following things legally in light of the car accident that happened to you:

  1. Let the other driver’s insurance provider know that you’ll be submitting a personal injury claim to them.

Your medical expenses and lost wages after becoming involved in a car accident can cost you a considerable amount of money. Thus, you’d want to seek compensation for damages that the incident itself had inflicted on your health and finances.

 

       You would have to inform the insurance provider of the other driver involved in the car accident that you’ll be filing a personal injury claim.

       The other driver’s insurance provider would then conduct their own investigation surrounding the car accident that both you and their client got involved in so that they can assess the validity of your claim.

       An initial settlement offer would then be proposed to you by the other driver’s insurance provider once they accept your claim.

 

  1. Consider an out of court settlement between you and the other driver’s insurance provider.

While you’d be forgiven for initially thinking of filing a lawsuit against the other driver involved in the car accident, court proceedings of civil cases such as yours usually take up a lot of time and money that could’ve been better used for your recovery back to full health instead.

       Most car accident cases are usually settled out of court either through mediation or arbitration so that you and the other driver involved won’t have to show up in court, especially as it might get in the way of both of you making a living.

       However, an out of court settlement can only happen if the other driver’s insurance provider would agree as well to it. If they don’t, you would have to skip the rest of this item and move on to the next one instead.

       If you haven’t sought the counsel of an attorney yet, you would want to do so in the event of an out of court settlement so that they can guide you as to whether you should accept the initial amount being offered to you by the other driver’s insurance provider or ask for it to be raised a bit higher to cover your damages.

 

  1. In case you’re still insufficiently compensated despite settling out of court, you can take the other driver to court.

As the final amount decided upon during an out of court settlement either through mediation or arbitration might still not be enough to serve as compensation for the damages that you sustained after being involved in a car accident, you can file a lawsuit against the other driver to make them pay your damages in full.

 

       Filing a lawsuit against the other driver is time-constrained though, so you should check your state’s statute of limitations and make sure to lodge a complaint within the allowed time period.

       You might have to prepare to defend yourself as well in case the other driver or their insurance provider would file a counterclaim against you.

       You would want to avoid taking your car accident case to court as much as possible, though should the need arise, filing a lawsuit must only be used as a last resort measure.

Car accidents are avoidable as long as anyone behind the wheel knows how to drive safely. Still, it isn’t safe to assume that all drivers would exercise caution while operating their vehicles. For every defensive driver, there are at least a couple of negligent drivers out there, one of which can crash into your vehicle when you least expect it.

For that reason alone, you’d want to remember the above-listed things that you’re legally allowed to do in case you become involved in a car accident. And to further discuss any legal technicalities that might arise after being on the receiving end of a car accident, you should consult a lawyer with a strong background on car accident cases who can represent you if ever you or the other driver involved would have to show up and settle your differences either out of or in court.

 

Benjamin Washington

 

Benjamin Washington is a promising young law writer currently writing for Stewart Guss. He hopes to apply his years of study into helping explain legal issues to the public. Benjamin loves cooking and often cooks for his family during weekends.

Posted by on in Uncategorized

Smart Motorway Map Of The UK

As the number of smart motorways grow across the country, it’s important to know how to identify them and how to use them effectively. Therefore we’ve collected together all the important information you need to know – where you can find them, how to use them and what different types of smart motorways there are.

Jump To Our Smart Motorway Map

Smart Motorway Stats and Facts

  • Smart motorway cameras catch around 1000 drivers speeding a week
  • There are 236 miles+ worth of smart motorways in England
  • 200 miles worth of smart motorways are currently planned or under construction
  • Motorway traffic is predicted to increase by up to 60% from 2010 by 2040
  • £1.5 billion has been invested into new smart motorways

What Are Smart Motorways?

Smart motorways make use of real time traffic management techniques to reduce congestion and help traffic move more freely, with techniques including variable speed limits and ‘all lane running’ schemes.

Regional traffic control centres monitor traffic closely to consistently update and amend speed limits and signs on smart motorways, informing users of any upcoming congestion or hazards. This method of reducing congestion means that there is no need for motorways to be widened with extra lanes added.

Smart motorway traffic management was developed by Highways England (previously Highways Agency) to reduce costs, improve journey times and minimise our impact on the environment.

Different Types of Smart Motorways

Controlled

smart motorway variable speed limit

This type of smart motorway has mandatory speed limits with a hard shoulder available for emergencies only.

Hard Shoulder Running

The hard shoulder can be opened during busy, peak times on the motorway when needed, reducing congestion.

All Lanes Running

This type of smart motorway opens all lanes for traffic to use including a former hard shoulder and makes use of variable speed limits.

How To Use Smart Motorways

Speed Limits

Stick to the speed limits indicated, these have been displayed to prevent stop-start traffic from occurring and you could land yourself a fine if you ignore them. If no signs are displayed the national speed limit will apply.

Red Xs

A red X signals that a lane is closed and you must not drive in it. This could be due to a broken down vehicle, a person, an animal or debris in the road. It can also indicate that a hard shoulder is currently closed, so avoid a penalty by obeying the red cross.

Hard Shoulders

Hard shoulders are identifiable by a solid white line separating them from other motorway lanes. On some smart motorways you can use these if there is a speed limit above the lane; if there is no sign or a red cross in the lane this means you should treat it as a regular hard shoulder, leaving it free and not using it unless there is an emergency.

What happens if I break down or have an accident?

With all lane running and hard shoulder running motorways you will notice intermittent refuge areas for use in emergencies. If your vehicle is unfortunate enough to experience a breakdown or get into an accident you should first switch on your hazard lights then make your way to the nearest emergency refuge area. The furthest these are separated by is 1.5 miles and are identifiable by blue signs with orange SOS telephone symbols.

If this is not possible, try to get to the nearest verge if it is safe to do so and exit via the left hand door, waiting behind the safety barriers. If you cannot get to the inside lane, stay inside your vehicle with your seatbelt on and if you are in a dangerous situation unable to leave your car safely phone 999. The traffic control centre will then be able to use their smart roadside technology to manoeuvre traffic around you safely.

What are Hadecs 3 cameras?

The HADECS 3 speed cameras are being used on smart motorways throughout the country. Smaller and less recognisable than usual speed cameras, they are painted grey, are small and don’t rely on film to capture those speeding. They take three snapshots when triggered that are sent to enforcement staff.

Where Are Smart Motorways In The UK? Check Out Our Smart Motorway Map

”Smart”Smart

Smart Motorways in London

All lanes running 
M3 J2-4a
M25 J5-6/7
M25 J23-27

Controlled
M1 J6a-10
M26 J16-23
M25 J10-16
M25 J18-10
M25 J7-8
M20 J4-7
M25 J2-3
M25 J27-30

Hard Shoulder running 
M1 J10-13

Smart Motorways in Birmingham

All Lanes Running
M6 J10a-13

Controlled
M42 J3a-M40 J16

Hard shoulder running
M6 J8-10a
M6 J5-8
M42 J3a-7 (pilot)
M42 J7-9
M6 J4-5

 

Smart Motorways in Manchester

All Lanes Running
M62 J18-20

Controlled
M60 J8-18

Smart Motorways in Bristol

Hard shoulder running
M4 J19-20
M5 J15-17

 

Smart Motorways in the North

All lanes running

M1 J28-31
M1 J32-35a
M1 J39-42

Controlled

M1 J25-28

Hard Shoulder Running

M62 J25-30

 smart motorway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by on in Uncategorized

b2ap3_thumbnail_chrisblog1.jpg

Image source: Unsplash

Road Trip Tips


It’s road trip time! Whether you’re going with your family as a chance to get more driving practice as a learner or venturing independently with just a bunch of mates to keep you company now that you’ve passed your test, there’s something incredibly exciting about heading off on a long journey!

So if you’re planning to visit far-flung family over Christmas, driving from coast to coast, or even just have a long car journey ahead of you for less interesting reasons, follow these top tips for an awesome trip!

b2ap3_thumbnail_chrisblog2.jpg

Image source: Unsplash

1 – Pre-trip checks

It goes without saying to give the car a quick check before setting off on a long journey, but in the last-minute rush to cram everything into the boot and fuel up, it’s easy to forget!

If you’ll be going on a really long trip or driving abroad it might be worth taking the car to your local garage for a proper once-over, but there are plenty of useful checks you can do yourself. A lot of them are even part of “Show me, tell me” section of your driving test!

Make sure you take a look at:

·         Brakes and power steering

·         Oil, engine coolant, brake fluid and screen wash levels (including antifreeze in winter!)

·         Headlights and tail lights, indicators, break lights, wipers

·         Tyre pressure and tread depth (when tyres are cold). If you have a spare tyre, remember to check it too!

·         Any warning lights on the dashboard

 

 b2ap3_thumbnail_chrisblog3.jpg

Image source: Unsplash

2 – Pack


There are a number of things that are always useful to have in the car, especially on longer trips:

·         A hi-vis vest, warning triangle, first aid kit, your insurance details and membership details if you belong to a roadside recovery service

·         A phone charging cable or portable battery (depending on how modern your car is, for the cigarette lighter plug or for your stereo system’s USB port)

·         Bottled water (to drink and for your car radiator in emergencies until you can get to a garage. Make sure it’s not tap water though, because the minerals could damage your engine, and try to mix it with coolant/antifreeze if you do have to do this. It’s a good idea to inform yourself about your car’s specific requirements before you set off in case you can’t get any phone signal to Google it!)

·         A physical atlas/map, in case your GPS runs out of battery or has no signal

·         Spare oil/coolant/screen wash etc.

·         Small change for parking meters (or tolls depending on where you’re driving)


If you’re travelling in winter there are a few extra things to consider:

b2ap3_thumbnail_chrisblog4.jpg

 Image source: Pexels

·         Blanket/s, pillows etc. if you get stranded somewhere (also useful for tired passengers!). Foil emergency blankets are also good, not to mention compact!

·         Antifreeze

·         An ice scraper

·         A torch

·         Some non-perishable food (see next tip!)

·          

b2ap3_thumbnail_chrisblog5.jpg

Image source: Pexels

3 –  Snacks

It’s technically not illegal to eat and drink while driving in the UK, but be aware that you can still get a fine if it causes you to drive ‘carelessly’ and you aren’t in full control of the vehicle as a result.

That being said, it’s always a good idea to take snacks on a road trip! Good road trip snacks are easy to eat and pass around, for example cereal bars, crackers/oatcakes and fruit.

For the car’s sake it might be worth considering non-crumbly foods, but if crisps are your fuel of choice you can always vacuum when you get back. Let’s face it, by the end of a long drive there will always be rogue crumbs, wrappers and assorted other rubbish like stray coffee cups floating around, so what’s an extra smooshed crisp or two in the grand scheme of things!

As far as drinks are concerned, keep in mind that energy drinks and coffee may mean you’ll need to make more bathroom stops than you would otherwise!

 


b2ap3_thumbnail_chrisblog6.jpg

Image source: Pexels

4 –  Route

Planning your route in advance is a no-brainer. But even if you plan to rely on your trusty smartphone or Satnav, make sure you bring backup because technology can let you down at the most inconvenient times –  and you don’t want that to happen when you’re lost in the dark in the middle of nowhere!

It’s also a good idea to designate a navigator who’s in charge of keeping track of where you are and setting up the Satnav, especially if you’re driving somewhere unfamiliar. That leaves you free to concentrate on the road and the other cars rather than where you’re going

Print off your route from Google Maps or your map of choice, bring an atlas and download the areas you need on your smartphone navigation app so that you can use it in offline mode. Sometimes that means that you can still find out exactly where you are if your GPS is working but you can’t get phone signal.

Bonus hack: you can mount your phone on your dashboard without a special holder – just be sure to check this before you drive off to make sure it’s secure. The UK law is very strict on phone use while driving, and even if you’re using your phone to navigate it must be set to hands-free and you can’t touch it while you’re behind the wheel.

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_chrisblog7.jpg

Image source: Wordpress.com

5 –  Entertainment

You’ll definitely want to bring some entertainment for a long drive. Instead of relying on the radio, set up a playlist before you go, or even go old-school and make a mixtape/CD! That means you get to listen to songs you actually want to hear rather than the fifteen top chart songs on a loop, because even if you don’t mind those, they’ll get old pretty fast. Some people like listening to audio books on trips, though be aware that they might distract you a bit.

If you’re on an easy stretch of the drive, channel your inner kid and play some road trip games –  just try to avoid “I spy” if you’re currently in the driver’s seat! There are also plenty of fun grown-up road trip games you can try!

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_chris-blog-8.jpg

Image source: Pexels

6 – Breaks and Exercise

Another no-brainer really, but if you’re trying to get somewhere on schedule it can be easy to neglect this one. Tiredness causes almost 20% of accidents on major roads, so make sure you do take plenty of breaks –  the Department for Transport recommends stopping for at least fifteen minutes every two hours.

Also remember to check the labels of any medications you’re taking (e.g. antihistamines or cough syrups) in case they cause drowsiness.

Anyone who’s done long trips before knows that you also get pretty stiff from sitting so long, and especially stop-and-start traffic can cause your muscles to ache from using the clutch so much. Try some stretches and exercises when you stop for a rest – your body will thank you!

 

Hopefully these tips will make your road trip even better! Safe travels!

b2ap3_thumbnail_chris-blog-9.jpg

Image source: Pexels

 

 Blog Kindly produced by Spend It Like Beckham at www.silb.co.uk

Posted by on in Uncategorized

 

 

Driving and Drowsiness – A Dangerous Combination

 

Being drowsy whilst driving is a major problem in the UK, and it’s enough to test even the safest and most experienced of drivers. Drowsy driving usually happens when you have not slept enough, but can also occur due to untreated sleep disorders, taking medications, or even shift work. It can affect you at any time, as it’s difficult to pinpoint the exact moment when sleep comes over the body. Just as driving while intoxicated is risky and dangerous, not to mention illegal, drowsiness makes you less able to pay attention to the road, slows your reaction time particularly if you need to break or steer abruptly, and affects your ability to make sound driving decisions. We are all aware of the common dangers associated with driving while alert, such as other cars failing to signal and low visibility, but drowsiness is an equally dangerous way to hurt yourself and other drivers around you. A lack of sleep accounts for approximately 20% of all crashes on main roads here in the UK, so don’t be a statistic, pull over to rest or change drivers if you feel any warning signs coming on. 

Legally Responsible

In the UK, if you have a car accident whilst sleep deprived, the law will make you accountable. Although the courts have some deal of flexibility on this matter, if you are charged with dangerous driving, and by definition this means driving in a way that is below the minimum acceptable standard and poses a risk to personal injury or safety, then you will be charged. While a judge’s sentence may vary depending on the amount of damage caused by an accident, at the very minimum your license will be revoked. A prison sentence of up to five years is also possible, even if no serious injury or harm has been done. It is clear to see that the UK judicial system takes driving whilst drowsy very seriously.

 

Is It That Common?

Surprisingly, driving whilst tired is more common than one would think. What would seem as something that is easily avoidable by following a regular pattern of sleep and ensuring your energy levels are stable, driving whilst tired happens more often than imagined. For example, if you are looking forward to an event or a special occasion and are unable to sleep through the night, you may well find yourself sleep deprived in the morning. This poses potential risks to your driving skills, including excessive speeding, or worse, nodding off at the wheel.

Most accidents occur between the hours of 2-6am, even amongst those who are sober. At this time of the day, most people are relaxed and a bit more carefree with their driving as the roads are generally quieter. This is when drivers lose control of their vehicles and crash as their focus is not on other vehicles around them.  

 

Commercial drivers – those who operate tow trucks and buses, for example, are particularly vulnerable during this time of the day, and for two main reasons. Firstly, commercial drivers tend to either be on a delivery deadline or need to return to their base depot, and because of this, they rarely break through the night and get the rest they need. Secondly, and as the Freight Transport Association points out, there is a lack of rest-stop facilities for commercial drivers on UK motorways. The Association describes this shortage as a mistake and an example of how money and business will always win over common sense and personal safety.

The Warning Signs of Drowsy Driving

There is a difference between being tired and being too tired to drive, and it’s something that can hit you at any time. You may start on an all-day car journey perfectly fine and alert, but as the journey progresses you can easily start to feel tired.

The National Sleep Foundation has identified a few symptoms to watch out for which can help you determine when to take a rest break. Some of these symptoms include:

·         - Struggling to focus accompanied by frequent blinking and heavy eyelids

·         - Daydreaming and keeping your focus

·        -  Difficulty remembering the last distances driven

·        -  Missing your exit and drifting from your lane

·        -  Repeated yawning and irritability

 

If it feels as though you are suffering from one or more of these symptoms, find a safe place to pull off on the side of the road, such as a resting spot. If you have another person in the vehicle who is licensed and insured to drive, ask them to take over. Just remember not to panic if you feel any of these symptoms as increased fear means there is a generally a higher risk of crash.

Although drinking coffee can help in small doses, it is best not to rely on it as a solution to your drowsiness as too much caffeine can make a driver experience lapses in concentration and slower reaction times. Coffee consumption is only to be used as a quick fix and not as a substitute for regular breaks. The best advice is to stay calm and exercise caution and good judgement so you can get to your destination safely and securely.

Article written and kindly supplied to us by Justin Fox

Posted by on in Uncategorized

Unusual driving laws from around the world

During Road Safety week, road safety charity Brake and insurance firm Aviva brought to light the dangers we face while driving every day. According to a recent survey from Aviva, four in five drivers think they’re a safe driver, although more than a third don’t recognise basic road signs, and a third of drivers still use their phones behind the wheel.

Richard Coteau, Corporate Fundraising Manager from Brake highlighted that: “From our research and surveys, we know that driver distraction affects people, even more with many admitting that the temptation to update social media is too much to resist.”

Aviva conducted some research, looking into road safety around the world, highlighting what the safest countries are doing, such as Sweden and Finland – two countries which have some of the safest roads in the world. With the help of Aviva, we looked at how other countries around the world keep their roads and road users safe, and picked out some of the most unusual road rules.

 

Russia: Keep your car clean

Drivers have to keep up their vehicle’s appearances in Russia, as it could lead to a 2,000 ruble fine. This was originally set up so license plates are always visible.

Mind the gap in Singapore

Watch out for pedestrians, as it’s against the law for drivers to come within 50 metres of them.

In South Africa give way to herds

Herds have as much right to the roads as drivers and other road users. Drivers could face a stiff fine if they don’t give way to passing livestock.

Safety first in Turkey

It’s important drivers carry a fire extinguisher, reflective triangle and first aid kit, otherwise there’s risk of a fine.

Italy’s increased nighttime fines

Drivers caught committing serious driving offences between 10pm and 7am could find themselves being fined an extra third of the daytime fine.

No topless driving in Thailand

Try to keep your clothes on in Thailand! It’s illegal and drivers could face a fine if they don’t have a top on.

France: Slow down when it rains

When the heavens open in France, drivers are required to reduce their speed by 10km/hour on rural and dual carriageways, and a 20km/hour reduction on motorways.

To find out more about road safety around the world, read through Aviva’s Safe Driving hub, with useful guides and expert opinions.

 

Kindly supplied to us by Aviva Insurance

Posted by on in Uncategorized

 

We hope you enjoy this Infographic which has been kindly given to us by Insure the Learner, and a link to their website is https://www.insurelearnerdriver.co.uk/

 

[:"","width":"400","height":"225"}[/embed]

Britain’s a nation of angry drivers

Every week, 30 million car drivers are left raging on the roads, according to research conducted on behalf of Ocean Finance.

With as many as 10 million Brits getting agitated behind the wheel every day, it would seem the streets of the UK are a major cause of anger.

Those living in Wales were most likely to keep their cool when faced with driving annoyances. Comparatively, the North East comes out as the hotspot for hotheads, with 92% admitting to losing their rag on the road at least once a week.

Furthermore, men (88%) were marginally more likely to see red than women (84%).

Tailgating, people not indicating and people who use their mobile phone behind the wheel came out as the top pet peeves for most drivers. Other common irritations include:

Bad habits on the road  Number of people who say they get annoyed by others doing this

Not indicating

6.6m

Tailgaters

6.6m

Using a mobile phone

6.5m

Being cut-up

2.6m

Speeding

2.6m

Not saying ‘thank you’

2.4m

Driving below the speed limit

2m

Blocking junctions

2m

Jumping traffic lights

1.2m

Drifting out of lanes

0.9m

 

When faced with people who annoy them on the road, 8 million Brits swear to release their frustration and a further 4.5 million use hand gestures to make their anger known.

As many as half a million Brits say that they would go to the length of following the car until it stops so they can tell the driver off – 18 to 24-year-olds were twice as likely to do this than any other age group.

Worryingly, one in three drivers say they have been in an incident as a result of someone’s careless, bad driving habits. While most (8 million) got away with just a minor incident, 2.5 million were caught up in a more serious accident.

Ian Williams, Ocean’s spokesperson, said: “The vast majority of drivers are careful, polite and considerate.  However, when we do encounter one that isn’t it seems that many of us struggle to keep our cool.  We’d urge drivers who encounter some dodgy driving to stay calm – getting stressed isn’t going to help.”

Editors’ notes

* Red Dot questioned a nationally representative sample of 2,000 adults aged 18 and over between 14th March 2016 – 17th March 2016, of whom 636 were Scottish residents. Figures have been extrapolated to fit ONS 2013 population projections of 50,371,000 UK adults.

About Ocean Finance

Established in 1991, Ocean Finance is one of the UK’s leading loan and mortgage brokers. The company works with many of the UK’s leading loan and mortgage lenders to help people find the right deal.

Website: www.oceanfinance.co.uk

For further information please contact:

Ian Williams

Ian.williams@thinkmoneygroup.com

@iwill41

 

Tel: 0161 605 6005 / Mob: 07855 214851

The information below was kindly sent to us for publication by Derek Eastwood, who is the  Business Development Manager at Hussey Fraser Solicitors in Dublin http://www.injury-solicitors.ie/

 

 [embed=videolink]{"video":"

An infographic by the team at Hussey Fraser","width":"400","height":"225"}[/embed]

 

 

Do you have your Practical Driving Test soon ?

Do you know about the questions you may be asked which are called the "Show Me / Tell Me" if not then you can check out the questions on our website as there are 20 in total, of which you will be asked 2. The 2 questions may consist of 2 show me, 2 tell me or a mix.

The questions are not difficult and just need practicing, if your learning with Parents ask them to go through them with you in your car, or if with a driving instructor ask them to help you which im sure they will cover this topic closer to test.

If you get a question wrong you get a minor so it is not the end of the world, however with some study it is avoidable and you leave the centre with a clean sheet, it also sets you up for your recommended weekly checks, which you can also find on our blog page.

This blog covers what to do if asked what is under you bonnet, and shows you what the engine looks like aswell as the items you maybe asked, for example you may be asked to identify one of the following and explain how you check it is correct:

1; Engine Oil

2; Engine coolant

3; Windscreen wash

4; Brake fluid

 

Watch the short video below which shows the Mini Cooper D 2014

Please let us know what you think and if we can help any further.

Posted by on in Uncategorized

 

 

 

 

 

When you pass your driving test, there’s an awful lot to think about. Obviously, finding a new car, getting used to the rules of the road and building confidence in your motoring capabilities are going to be at the top of your list. However, you’re probably also going to want to take advantage of the very reason you learnt to drive in the first place – complete freedom.

The likelihood is that you’re feeling ambitious, right? You want to get out there and take on the road. The world is your oyster. You’re probably looking to plan a road trip here and a road trip there. There’s no doubting it, it’s a great way of seeing the world. However, before you take on the roads of faraway lands, you should consider that the rules of the road are different the world over. Even in Europe. Carspring is an online dealership, based in both London and Berlin. Their experiences of the differences between England and Germany have clearly formed the basis of this intriguing infographic. It shows us how driving habits are different all over the continent. Not just when it comes to the rules of the road, but which cars people are likely to drive and what each car means for bumping up your social status.

  

 

 

Before you get planning your own tour of Europe, it might be a good idea to get yourself a car sorted that’s going to get you where you need to be. For your first car, it makes a lot of sense buying used. If you do, it’s well worth taking a look at the Carspring website to check out their new approach to used car sales. Simply log-on, browse their models, find your ideal car and choose how you want to pay. The company will deliver your new car to your door. For that added peace of mind, all the cars they sell on their site are inspected by the AA and come fully-guaranteed. Then, it’s time to book your ferry tickets, fill the boot and get exploring.

Posted by on in Uncategorized

Drink Driving at Christmas in the UK

Did you know that alcohol consumption in Britain increases by 40% during the month of December? It is a dangerous time of year for drivers on Britain’s roads over the festive holiday period. Tragically, one in six deaths on UK roads are as a result of drink drivers who are over the legal limit for alcohol consumption.

Interestingly, nearly one in six convicted drink drivers are actually caught the morning after the night before when they thought that they might be fine to drive, but were not. 19% of drivers admit to driving the morning after a night of heavy drinking and 6% of drivers are doing this monthly or more.

If you are one of the many people out and about in the UK this Christmas, think before you accept a drive from someone who has been drinking. What is a particularly worrying statistic is that 63% of people would be willing to get a lift with a designated driver who had been drinking alcohol in certain circumstances. Equally worrying is that 30% of people would put themselves at risk by getting a lift with someone who had two drinks or more, providing they ‘seemed safe’.

 

Have a look at this infographic created by CR Allen & Sons for more information and be safe, not sorry, this Christmas.

[embed=videolink]{"video":"